Ad Campaign: You Probably Won’t Get Shot Today

Despite reports of gun violence in the United States, the chance of you getting shot remains low. That’s the theme of a campaign that the U.S. Tourism Council is launching today to coax European and other tourists back to the United States.

“New York City, the Grand Canyon, the monuments in D.C.—these have historically been major attractions for families from Germany or Spain and we want them to become that once again,” said Sarah Hanson, president of the Tourism Council, at a press briefing announcing the new ad campaign.


Hanson pointed to a recent report by the United Nations World Tourism Organization that found global tourism hitting records, fueled in part by increasingly wealthy Chinese families eager to see the world outside their borders. Tourism is booming so much, in fact, that major destinations like Rome, London, and Paris are having trouble coping with the influx of people without sacrificing what makes the cities attractive in the first place. But U.S. cities are having no such trouble.

“Are we in crisis mode? No, but we’re getting close,” sats Roger Morton, president of Vacation Travel U.S.A., a tour company. “While vacationers are lining up to see the Eiffel Tower in Paris, the Empire State Building in New York City has trash blowing into the lobby. The United States has lost its shine.”


Travel specialists says the global unpopularity of Donald Trunp is part of the problem. But the bigger reason is the perception, particularly among Europeans, that the United States is riven by gun violence. “The read about The Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando and the school shooting in Parkland and they start to think the United States isn’t a safe place,” said Hanson.

The group’s campaign takes direct aim at that perception by touting the very small odds of you getting shot if you’re in the Unted States. “We’re just trying to restore a sense of proportion that you probably won’t get shot if you visit here,” Hanson says. “And that’s not a lie. Are you more likely to get shot than if you’re in, say, Copenhagen? Yes. But still, the odds are pretty low.”

If you have a tourism related website, the Council encourages you to put their ad on your site. It shows the very low odds of you getting shot in the United States on any given day. Download the ad. 

This is a work of satire. It is a fictional news article not meant to be taken seriously. Photos: pd and cc. Creative Commons and public domain. Not necessarily an endorsed use of images.

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