Hamburger Franchise: $15 Minimum Wage Is Fine; Announces Nationwide Unpaid Internship Program

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Internships available!

One of the largest employers of minimum-wage workers says it “totally” supports increasing the minimum wage to $15 from the current $7.25, and it also says it wants to help unemployed young people obtain “real-world work experience” by launching a nationwide unpaid internship program.

“Many young people today simply don’t have an opportunity to get on-the-ground work experience,” Ned Turner, chairman and CEO of Hamburger O Rama, said at a press conference today at the company’s Omaha, Neb., headquarters. “That’s why we’re so excited about our initiative to give millions of young people concrete, nuts-and-bolts work experience by hiring them as unpaid interns.”

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Learning 40 Hours a week

Turner said the internship program will provide young people “invaluable” lessons in what makes a popular service business like Hamburger O Rama run. “Our business is built around a 99¢ hamburger,” he said. “Under our program, interns will learn everything about our core product: how to cook it, serve it, clean up after the customer has eaten it, maintain the kitchen, sweep the floor, wipe the counter, fill napkin holders, restock straws and napkins—everything.”

In fact, Turner said, there might not be another internship in the United States that gives interns as deep an on-the-ground experience as this one. “From the moment they clock in until the moment they clock out eight hours later, our interns will feel like they are actually a bona fide team member of our global company.”

The company hopes to have anywhere from 10 to 15 interns working each shift at each of its tens of thousands of Hamburger O Rama’s around the United States by mid-July. “We’re fast-tracking the internship because we’re so excited about giving young people work experience,” Turner said.

Older people can be interns, too, he added. “There is no age criteria to be part of the program.”

On the company’s support for a minimum $15 wage, Turner said Hamburger O Rama believes all of its employees should earn a living wage. “We are in 100-percent march-step with advocates that a higher minimum wage is about more than money; it’s about the dignity of work,” he said. “That’s why we are proud to be part of the movement to raise the minimum wage in this country.”

Persons interested in applying for the company’s unpaid internship program can fill out an application online.

This is a work of satire. It is fictional news article not meant to be taken seriously. Photo: t, ka (Creative Commons via Wikimedia Commons). Not necessarily an endorsed use of images.

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